Edge protection, crane loading platforms,loading decks, Oil boiler servicing, Training courses, Manual Handling, Oftec, Manual handling training,abrasive wheels training, BER.
 
Edge protection, crane loading platforms,loading decks, Oil boiler servicing, Training courses, Manual Handling, Oftec, Manual handling training,abrasive wheels training, BER.
   
  COURSES AVAILABLE:

Manual Handling
Abrasive Wheels
 

MANUAL HANDLING

This is a half-day course designed to provide the participants with the knowledge of safe manual handling in the areas of lifting, pushing, pulling and moving of different types of materials and equipment.

Course Objectives
On completion of this course the participants will be able to:
»         Identify any hazards associated with manual handling in their workplace
»         Apply the principles of safe lifting to all their activities
»         Recognise any load, which may be too heavy or awkward to lift safely
»         Understand the limitations of the spine and muscular system

 
Edge protection, crane loading platforms,loading decks, Oil boiler servicing, Training courses, Manual Handling, Oftec, Manual handling training,abrasive wheels training, BER.

Course Content
»         Manual Handling Legislation – as it applies to the employer and employee
»         Dangers and harm caused by careless /unskilled methods of manual handling
»         Anatomy of the spine and muscular system
»         How to handle loads safely
»         Practice in safe handling of loads.

 

Legislation

What legislation covers manual handling?

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work, (General Applications) Regulations 2007, Chapter 4 of  Part 2, outline the requirements that must be adhered to in relation to manual handling.

  • These Regulations requires the employer to organise the work to allow the use of mechanical or other means to avoid the need for the manual handling of loads by employees in the workplace. Organisational measures can include designing or automating a work activity to eliminate the need for manual handling (e.g. arrange for wrapping or packaging in situ or bringing treatment to a patient rather than vice versa).  It can also mean giving special consideration to the bulk purchase or movement of raw materials so as to eliminate the need to lift sacks or bags (e.g. flour, grain, powdered chemicals and animal feedstuffs or cement) and to introduce new arrangements (e.g. cement silos on building sites). Employers must consider whether manual handling can be eliminated or reduced in the design of systems of work.
  • At the outset the employer will need to carry out a full risk assessment of existing manual handling tasks before making an informed decision on what manual handling tasks need to be avoided or reduced.
  • The Regulations set out a framework for employers to avoid or reduce manual handling activity.  Employers must assess their manual handling operations and take steps to avoid or reduce the risk of injury.  The risk can be avoided or reduced through the introduction of appropriate organisational measures such as improved layout of work area to reduce unnecessary long carrying distances; or the use of appropriate means, in particular mechanical equipment.
  • Risk assessment is a process which involves gaining a detailed understanding of a task being carried out, collecting all relevant technical details of the task, identifying if there are risk factors/hazards present, exploring what options or solutions are available to reduce or eliminate the risk factors/hazards and putting a plan in place to introduce the agreed control measure


How often do employees need refresher training?
Refresher training will be at intervals not more than every three years and when there is any major change in the work involved or equipment used or when an employee is transferred to another activity requiring different loads to be handled.

 

ABRASIVE WHEELS

In what places of work do these Regulations apply?
These Regulations apply to the following places where an abrasive wheel is used for any grinding or cutting operation, i.e:



  • every factory
  • every other premises to which the provisions of the Factories Act 1955 apply
  • every dock, wharf, quay, warehouse, line or siding, whereby the provisions of section 86(1) of the Factories Act 1955 applies
  • every harbour, wet dock or ship, whereby the work being carried out is referred to in section 87(1) of the Factories Act 1955
  • every place and every line or siding where building operations or works of engineering construction are being undertaken, whereby the provisions of section 88(1) or 89(1) of the Factories Act 1955 apply.
Edge protection, crane loading platforms,loading decks, Oil boiler servicing, Training courses, Manual Handling, Oftec, Manual handling training,abrasive wheels training, BER.

Do I need a CSCS ticket to operate an abrasive wheel?
No. CSCS tickets are issued in accordance with training under the Construction Skills Certification Scheme. The Abrasive Wheel Regulations require that any user of abrasive wheels is trained and competent to do so, and so they require formal training in abrasive wheels, but they are not issued with CSCS tickets after such training. This training must be administered by a competent person, in accordance with the Regulations.

Who is allowed mount an abrasive wheel?
The Regulations state that a person can only mount an abrasive wheel if:

  • They have been trained appropriately, in accordance with the Regulations
  • They are competent to mount such an abrasive wheel
  • They have been appointed by the occupier of the place of work to do so.
 
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